Bacterial Contamination of Platelet Concentrates (Ongoing)

Posted On 2020-08-04 15:50:19



This series on “Bacterial Contamination of Platelet Concentrates” is edited by Dr. Sandra Ramirez-Arcos from Canadian Blood Services and University of Ottawa, Canada.

Sandra Ramirez-Arcos, BSc, MSc, PhD
Centre for Innovation, Canadian Blood Services, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

Dr. Sandra Ramirez-Arcos trained as a microbiologist in her native Colombia and then conducted PhD studies in Biological Sciences in Spain. From 1998 to 2002, Dr. Ramirez did her post-doctoral training and worked as a research associate at the University of Ottawa. Since 2003, she has worked at Canadian Blood Services where she currently holds a position as a Senior Scientist. Dr. Ramirez is also an Adjunct Professor at the University of Ottawa.

Dr. Ramirez-Arcos has built a strong team with expertise on bloodborne bacteria. Her research projects are focused on understanding bacterial growth dynamics and biofilm formation during blood component storage. Her laboratory oversees the development, validation and implementation of protocols and processes aimed at enhancing blood component safety.

Series outline:

  1. Transfusion-associated bacterial infection: Safety risks and mitigation strategies
  2. FDA Guidance to Control for Bacterial Contamination in Platelets: Advantages and Limitations
  3. The Large Volume Delayed Sampling (LVDS) bacterial testing algorithm of Hema-Quebec: Pros and Cons
  4. BacT/ALERT systems for detection of bacterial contamination in platelet concentrates: Sensitivity and Specificity
  5. The PGD Verax Immunoassay for detection of bacterial contamination in platelet concentrates: Sensitivity and Specificity
  6. The Intercept system for bacterial inactivation in whole blood and blood components: Advantages and Limitations
  7. The Mirasol system for bacterial inactivation in whole blood and blood components: Advantages and Limitations
  8. The Theraflex system for bacterial inactivation in whole blood and blood components: Advantages and Limitations
  9. Septic transfusion reactions involving contaminated platelet concentrates: Residual risk despite intervention strategies
  10. Bacterial contamination of platelet concentrates in Latin America: Current status

Disclosure:
The series “Bacterial Contamination of Platelet Concentrates” was commissioned by the editorial office, Annals of Blood without any sponsorship or funding. Sandra Ramirez-Arcos is serving as the unpaid Guest Editor for the series.